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RC Podcast: Dullah Beatz 23/01/2018

Luke Taylor
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Our latest podcast comes from the highly respected South London Grime beat maker and Big Narstie’s tour DJ, Dullah Beatz.

We caught up with the South London Grime DJ, Dullah Beatz, who you can regularly here across the Rinse FM airwaves as well as being Big Narstie’s tour DJ. We were also treated to an exclusive mix packed full of ‘underground heat’, for our latest podcast installment for January 2018.

Dullah Beatz

Give us some idea of what it was like growing up in South London in the early noughties when the first wave of grime took off? 

This was a great time for the music in general listening to crews like So Solid, Pay As You Go and Heartless as no one had really done it before so when it started becoming more popular everyone was gassed, jumping on underground radio and spitting their hearts out. Most of us would all meet up at youth clubs or radio as there was no internet connecting us, just the love of music and the drive to do better, so this got us going to the studio, recording tracks and taking music more seriously.

 

What’s going down for Dullah Beatz in 2018, are you still acting as a tour DJ for Big Narstie?

Yeah me and Narstie will always be working together on something as we’ve been doing from the start. This year I’m setting up my own record label so I can focus on releasing my instrumentals as well as vocals.

 

If you had to use the same DJ’ing kit for the rest of your life (2 decks + mixer) what would they be and why?

I’d choose the CDJ 2000 decks and a DJM 900 mixer because they’re very versatile and they cater to all my needs as a DJ. The mixer is full of effects and sounds amazing, and you don’t have to carry records, just roll up with a USB and you’re good to go. But I’d still have Technics 1210s hidden away because nothing sounds better than vinyl.

 

What would you say really drew you to the art of ‘turntablism’ in the beginning and how do you think the Garage/Grime DJing style differs from say House, etc?

Radio played a big part in this as I’d listen to DJs like EZ and Mac 10 who at the time were smashing the underground airwaves with sick beat matching. I’d say the main difference between DJing for Grime and House is that Grime is less strict, you can mix a R&B track at 140 with Pulse X and it sounds amazing and that’s a good Grime mix, whereas with House it’s mainly about the drums being a consistent hypnotic rhythm.

 

Talk us through the mix you did for RC, tracks and inspirations?

This mix is 45 minutes packed full of underground heat. Most of the tracks are unreleased Grime dubs produced by myself mixed with others tunes I’m currently feeling. i decided to start the mix with the more melodic side of grime then switch it up towards the middle with some super stompers hope you all enjoy.

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Luke Taylor
Luke Taylor

Luke has lived and breathed the associated lifestyles & subcultures of RC for the last 20 years, as well as gaining a vast knowledge and a wealth of experience in the industry since 2006. His passion is really the techwear side of the spectrum, with brands like Stone Island & Acronym being among some of his personal favorites. Set up in 2013, his industry background & knowledge has seen RC go from strength to strength to become the digital magazine, platform & authority it is today.

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